Categories
South America

Raw Travel Hits Record Growth 6th Straight Year

Raw Travel visits Omo River Valley in Ethiopia for Season 7

RAW TRAVEL TV HITS ALL-TIME HIGH AUDIENCE GROWTH, YET AGAIN 

– Series Proclaims Authentic Travel is Stronger Than Political, Paranormal or Gossip – 

NEW YORK, NY: December 18th, 2019 – AIM Tell-A-Vision® Group (AIM TV) announced today that its internationally syndicated television series Raw Travel® recorded its most substantial audience full season figures to date for its just completed 6th season. With a still-growing affiliate list that includes 173 cities in 95% of U.S. TV households, the 2018-19 Season 6 of Raw Travel was the sixth straight year of both audience and distribution growth.

The producers further crowed that the soon to be completed calendar year of 2019 is on track to be Raw Travel’s best year ever with +4% year to year total audience growth over calendar year 2018. Raw Travel’s continued growth, as most shows face eroding audiences due to fragmentation, continues to surprise observers.

The recently launched Season 7 (2019-20) includes a roster of far-flung destinations including, China, Ethiopia, South Korea, Indonesia, Georgia (the country), Turkey, Ukraine, Lithuania, and more. Closer to home destinations in South America, the Caribbean, and the USA are also featured.

With outlets such as the former Travel Channel switching to “paranormal,” Raw Travel has diversified to showcase a more extensive array of travel, such as Recreational VehiclesRoad Trips, Sailing ExcursionsSolo Travel, Voluntourism, Ecotourism, and more. 

“There is such an obvious void on U.S. television of authentic travel content,” states Robert G. Rose, Executive Producer, and Host. “Cable seems to have lost its bearings, is floundering and frankly seems desperate. We believe this presents a great opportunity for Over the Air, Free Broadcast TV, assuming broadcasters answer the call,” said Rose. “As cable continues to zig, we’ll continue to zag, and as they continue to lose their audience, we’ll continue to grow ours. If they are going to leave the entire niche up to us, we’ll gladly serve it,” Rose Continued.

Also bucking current media trends, Raw Travel has continued to attract younger demographics to broadcast TV while growing traditional core demographics from lead-in programs all across the country. The fiercely independently produced show has ranked #1 or #2 in key demographics in time-slots in significant markets the past six seasons, even when up against network or large studio productions, showcasing viewers’ appetites for authentic shows with socially relevant messaging.

Besides pay-TV outlets in Europe, Asia, and Africa, several major commercial airlines and cruise ships have begun licensing the series, spreading the Raw Travel movement of socially conscious, authentic adventure travel to viewers in all corners of the globe.

A short trailer showcasing Raw Travel’s Six Season growth spurt seasons can be found at www.RawTravelTrailer.com while www.RawTravel.tv and www.RawTravel.tv/wheretowatch offers more info, listings of U.S. cities, affiliates, and time slots.

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ABOUT RAW TRAVEL TV

Raw Travel is an adventure travel & lifestyle series showcasing socially and environmentally aware, independent travel. The series weaves together themes of eco-tourism and voluntourism (giving back) with underground music and authentic culture in a unique way. Each weekend the show is seen in over 173 U.S. cities on major broadcast affiliates as well as in several international territories (Asia, Africa, Europe, etc.). It can also be found on several major airlines and soon in Over the Top (OTT Digital) platforms as well.  AIM Tell-A-Vision Group produces and distributes the show domestically. Visit www.RawTravel.tv for more information.

ABOUT AIM TELL-A-VISION GROUP

AIM Tell-A-Vision (AIM TV) Group is an independent content and distribution company founded by media veteran and entrepreneur Robert G. Rose. Since 2000, AIM TV has been producing and distributing positive, compelling content that reflects a mission of presenting “Media That Matters.” Visit www.AIMTVGroup.com for more information.

Categories
Peru South America

Surprisingly Lovable Lima

Lima, Peru – After living abroad in Latin America off and on for almost a year, I’ve come to expect the unexpected, both good and bad. I was not prepared, however, to fall in love with Lima, especially in the middle of their cold, damp and grey winter when the sun rarely if ever makes an appearance.

In fact, my eyes are super sensitive to sunlight so when out doors I almost always wear my sunglasses but in two weeks while in Lima, I never once wore them .

The cold, grey Lima beach in winter

Lima, Peru is a huge city and if you are visiting Peru, chances are you are at least stopping through this city of 8 million souls. Most travelers will spend 1 or maybe 2 nights here.

If you’ve done the Machu Picchu thing, you already know that while it’s stunning it’s also a little like visiting Disneyworld, albeit more beautiful, natural and spiritual. When I was there in 2007, I couldn’t escape the feeling I was trampling on something sacred.

At the time there were almost 1 million visitors per year and geologists, archeologists and even the U.N. were calling for limiting the number of visitors for fear of doing irreparable damage. Since then, I’ve heard that some steps have been taken to limit the number of visitors to Machu Picchu.

Luckily for Peru, there is so much more to this incredible country than Cusco and Machu Picchu and that includes the capital city of Lima.

The Modern Streets of Miraflores

This was my first time to spend a significant amount of time in Lima, so I wanted to live as much like a local as possible. After staying a few days in a hotel, I secured a small apartment  in the somewhat upscale and modern neighborhood of Miraflores.

Miraflores is where many tourists end up and I heard English being spoken almost as much as Spanish. Normally in such circumstances, I’d flee another direction, but after so many months of basic, survival conversations in Spanish (ordering food, securing a room, etc.) I was ready for just a touch of English and yes, even some Gringo culture.

Shopping in Parque Kennedy - Miraflores

Miraflores and nearby neighborhoods like San Isidro  are so modern, clean and full of high rises, it’s easy to forget you’re in a third world country.

In Miraflores life seems to revolve around Parque Kennedy, a beautiful park dedicated to the slain U.S. President. The park is surrounded by restaurants, hotels and hostels with tourists seamlessly mixing in with the locals.

Local kids playing in Parque Kennedy

Just off Parque Kennedy is Calle Pizza (Pizza Street) which is named after the inordinate amount of pizza restaurants. It could be renamed to Calle Tout, as a lone traveler this was really the only place I felt pressured and slightly harassed to buy stuff (legal or otherwise). Overall, I’ve seen much worse in my travels abroad and most travelers can freely roam around Miraflores without too much unwanted attention.

Outside the Inca Market in Miraflores

If you want souvenirs in a hassle free environment, at night vendors come from all over to the center of the park to ply their wares. Or try the massive Inca Market, just a few blocks away.

I think the thing I welcomed most about being in Lima was the wide variety of restaurants. I probably appreciated it more after spending so much time in Medellin, Colombia, where the local cuisine is awesome but can be a little redundant after a few weeks.

Manolo's in Miraflores

Of course I sampled the ceviche and sushi, which I had been craving for months, but I also tried some pretty good Middle Eastern food, vegetarian cuisine and of course street food, which in my case was a pavo (turkey) sandwich that was cheap and out of this world good (and cheap).

I also tried a longstanding, favorite restaurant for locals and travelers alike called Manolo’s, which is pretty legendary for their over sized deli sandwiches and churros, a common South American pastry that you can get filled with chocolate, dulce (caramel) and other flavors.

Churros @ Manolo's

In addition to the wide variety of food and accommodations, Lima has a decent amount of sites and cultural activities that could keep a traveler busy for a solid week or more.

Mural at El Averno Cultural Center

In El Central, the downtown area of Lima, there is the beautiful and picturesque area of San Martin that is also a good spot to sample a bit more authentic Lima nightlife. I was able to check out the area with some local residents who took me down a couple of side streets to see the El Averno Cultural Center, an important and very colorful cultural center well known in the Lima underground scene.

Plaza San Martin in Downtown Lima

Like most downtown areas in major cities, you want to be a little careful with your belongings and follow precautions like taking taxis and trying not to wander the streets alone at night.

Also near San Martin is the famous Magic Circuit of the Water in the Parque de la Reserva, which is reportedly one of the biggest outdoor water/light shows in the world. I’m disappointed to say that as close as I was, due to time constraints, I was unable to get by there and take this in, but I hear it is the thing to do.

The Huaca Pucclana Ruins in Lima

And if you are in the mood for ruins and don’t feel like paying the exorbitant fees to assist in the trampling of Cusco and Machu Picchu, then check out the  Huaca Pucclana ruins located right in the middle of the city on the outskirts of Miraflores.

The Huaca Pucclana ruins were settled sometime around 500 AD by the Lima Indians as a temple to worship the sea. The ruins are still being excavated and archeologists are still discovering fascinating details of what life was like for the Lima Indians every year.

I’ve seen a lot of ruins over the years (including the aforementioned Machu Picchu) and let me tell you I found Huaca Pucclana to be fascinating. Tours are provided in Spanish and English and last for about 45 minutes. Admission is only 10 soles (about $3.50 U.S.) and in my opinion that was money well spent.

In addition to ruins, they also raise animals that would have been typical during the time of the Lima Indians. These include llamas, alpacas, cuy (guinea pigs) as well as a hairless Peruvian dog that the Lima Indians bred and while nothing beautiful to look at, petting him was highly addictive.

"Shout" the hairless dog

His body temperature was so warm (evidently to compensate for lack of hair) and his hide felt a little like maybe a really warm elephant might feel. He enjoys being petted so much that he barks loudly when people stop, so the guy is a little spoiled and perhaps explains what I understood his name to be “Shout”.

According to our tour guide, this breed of dog was almost extinct just a few years ago, so the Peruvian government has taken steps to save the dogs, including making them the official dog of Peru. On the day I was at the ruins, there were folkloric dancers as well.

Now if you’re an adrenaline enthusiast, then just head to the Malecon overlooking the beach area of Miraflores. There are professional Parasailers that jump off the cliffs and travelers can either watch (like me) or for around a $50 U.S. fee, take a dive with the pros. Finding the parasailers is easy, just head to the hard to miss Parque del Amor (Park of Love) statues and look up or out to sea. Chances are you’ll see one flying by.

Parque Del Amor (Park of Love)

As I said, in Lima in winter, the sun does not shine much. In fact, it can be a bit gloomy and depressing with the heavy clouds and fog on a daily basis. But maybe because I found Lima to be such an international city with restaurants, nightlife and friendly but not overbearing locals I was really glad to be there.

After so much time in Latin America, I found Lima to be a good transitional city for me to  ease the culture shock of returning back in the U.S. Overall, it’s a good city for any city slicker traveler who’d like to experience authentic culture without missing some creature comforts.

So next time you’re in Peru, be sure and allocate a couple extra days to take in the sights, sounds and tastes of Lima and if you happen to visit outside of winter bring your sunglasses. I hear you’ll need them!